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CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 9:00am EST
creating words. 1840, much later, but he writes -- i'm sorry, 1820, he writes a letter to john adams, and he says, you know, our duty, our duty as americans is to knee control eyes. so jefferson creating all these words, and some of them are -- he creates the word ottoman. not for the empire, but for the not stool. he creates -- for the foot stool. there's 114 words now in the oxford english dictionary which are credited to jefferson either as the coiner or the introducer, the first one to actually bring them into the, into the mainstream. and the list is really sort of fascinating. um, pedicure is his word. pussy -- i'm sorry, pussy, that's teddy roosevelt. monoaccurate, meaning a person who believes in a single rule. the one that becomes the most egregious to the purists and the language police is the word "belittle." he creates the word belittle. he knows what he's up to. he knows he's creating something that's going to be very disturbing. noah webster himself just loves the word. in fact, one of noah webster's teachers at yale writes noah webster a letter about the word "belittle," an
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 8:00am EST
] >> john, that was really, really terrific. i'm always glad here and other optimist in washington. you will all have seen the book i hope outside, perhaps you've had a chance to read it already. i encourage you to do so. it's full of great insight. let's have a few questions. whose first? sir. >> i'm bob hirschi. how can we move things further in the direction you talk about people do more for themselves as opposed to the government? >> i wish i had the total and to do that. the reason i talk about philosophy, if you look at what's happened to the united states we philosophically -- that's when you get public policy. policy follows ideas. so i think we have to defend the ideas that made america great. including personal responsibility, and i don't mean we ignore community but you can't into to what someone else produces and what someone else did. that's an important id. long-term the most important thing i think we did is we capture -- the left to go with universities and difficult universities, they took over the elementary education and a because they teach all the teachers. we've go
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 4:00pm EST
to attend to be, especially when great titans like henry clay and daniel webster and john c. calhoun and others were debating. imagine a much smaller senate chamber crowded with men who hated each other, although two although, a room reeking of cigar smoke, smelling of gas from gas lamps. carpets with spittoons scattered here and there misfitting in one direction or another, and it intends, congested atmosphere with political man and a great gladiatorial arena of america. postcode was there on the compromise? >> guest: henry clay had been in retirement. he was called out of retirement in kentucky to take charge of an attempt to create some kind of a compromise. he was not missed a great compromise their for the compromise of 1820, missouri compromise and most of the 1833 compromise over south carolina's nullification of federal law. henry clay was a grand, remarkable man i never wanted to say no when he was invited to speak to the center political intentions. so he returned to washington and let the debate for seven months, attempting to persuade congressmen for the right an
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 12:00pm EST
context, the national interest of your country. what john bose. millennium john's account. that was one of the more creative things we have done. it is bigger than that. until we get a president that does that, then is able to implement, by the way in partnership with the congress, doesn't mean the congress has to agree with everything but you can't treat article i of the constitution like it is an appendix, like it is a nuisance. if for no other reason you can't sustain a foreign-policy, you can't sustain a war, the people of america, 70% consistently are gone in iraq. you can prove or disprove that. those are not my numbers. it is over. it is over like it is a matter of how we get out now. you have got to have a policy that the american people understand, make sense for the country and will sustain. that requires partnership. >> thank you very much. appreciate your time. [applause] >> thank you all for coming out tonight. appreciate it. [inaudible conversations] >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on our facebook call or se
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 8:00pm EST
speechwriter to take john kennedy and as we were walking through those marble corridors of the wonderful statues casting their shadows i think he might've been inspired that while the national archives is the place where history is stored, its the united states senate where our history is made in ways large and small. today history is being made. tomorrow history will be made. a united states senator excellent makes history with the very first moment they come into the united states senate and are sworn in. it's a tradition that a long-standing practice that has -- as a senator is sworn in is given a number and that number goes all the way back to the very first senate. the first distinction of the senators with the first two member -- numbers william clay and mcmorris numbers one and number two. we have had 1945 united states senators in our history. and i have the fortunate distinction of holding a very special number. my number is 1776. and so i have always thought very fondly of the extraordinary historical consequence of that number and what each senator does with that distinction a
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 11:00am EST
acquainted with meridian in the early 1980s when the president was ambassador hova, and john became a good friend and enlisted me into some projects. little did i realize that a few years from 1982-'83 i would be spending a lot of time here. and so i have some connection with this institution that goes back some time and have always admired the mission, the objective and what it does. i believe that this institution is as relevant and important today as it's ever been and maybe more so. stuart was very generous in his summary and review of my book which being the unabashed, gratuitous politician that i am -- [laughter] i'm not at all bashful about hawking it. but those of you who have written books, and many of you have -- and this is the first book, probably the only book i'll ever write -- i was not aware and still am not of how it all works. but i do know that you do not get rich on books unless you go into paperback rights and a number of other things. so we will not be e retiring soon -- retiring soon -- [laughter] from the book. let me begin where stuart left off, and if you wou
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 4:30pm EST
been looking for him. we would find out from what we got on that target about john doe, we might hit that at midnight, and we'd hit another at three in the morning. and the reason it was important to go fast is because terrorist networks repair themselves very quickly. as soon as if we were terrorists, as soon as mark is captured, pretty soon i'm going to hear about it. and the first thing i do is i move my location, and i change my -- all those things, connections that i have, and you call it cutouts because it moves to repair itself. so you've got to be quicker than they can repair themselves both to hit targets and also quicker than they can promote new people up, develop new leaders. and over time we started seeing the relative age of leaders of al-qaeda in iraq go down and the relative effectiveness go down because of that. so the op tempo became the rocky balboa strategy of pummel it as fast as you can so it can't breathe. and then over time had the decisive effect on it. which we actually did along with a number of other factors. >> one of the things i think that's very intere
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 7:00am EST
with walter, he's the one who got me involved in all of this, and john reed later on. were both i think significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked with a lot of people like, i think meeting mondello, having dealt with a number of cases, spent an hour in 1980 with fidel castro. he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt. and he said i can speak to you about that because we nationalize you in cuba, one of the first time who did was nationalist the foreign banks, and then you offset our reserves. so we're kind of evening. this was in nicaragua. certainly fascinating. i mean, i could run through so many people. one of the sessions with mondello, i was asked to tell mr. mole gabi, who was then president of zimbabwe and as the president of zimbabwe that he used all his time. he wasn't very happy with that. because of that i was able to do that our secretary of commerce ron brown asked me if i would cheer at the 50th anniversary in admissions the africa lunch that the us was getting at that time, which it did because he said look, if you can do that, then you ca
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 6:30am EST
they didn't think it was fair. and karl sanders and one of the conversations you can hear, and john connally, called lyndon johnson and told them if you would even let those two symbolic, the whole south will walk out of this convention because you will be turning the democratic party over to the negro, and letting martin luther king decide who can be a democrat. and johnson almost has a breakdown on the phone there, and basically went to bed for several days and said i'm going to quit. i can't handle this. i'm trying to turn the democratic party slowly toward a party that will represent its people. and he told karl sanders, he said, you and i cannot survive in our modern life, virtual exact quote. you and i cannot survive in the modern political life eating these folks for breakfast to win elections. we've got to let them vote. we've got to let them eat. we've got to let him shave, and these folks don't do it. and he thought he was going to quit. he said if i'm no good in the south, what good am i? i passed this bill and it looks like i can't do anything. so what i'm saying is that
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 10:00am EST
real treat this morning. as john mentioned, i'm a special forces officer by profession, and so this area is near and dear to my heart because this is kind of what we do, or did. they don't let me do it anymore. [laughter] i mentioned to max when he came in a little historical artifact in that when i was a cadet at west point, i bought a book that had just been published. it was a two-volume set. it was called war in the shadows, the guerrilla in history by robert asprague. that book from 1975 til now really has been the sort of benchmark for this kind of historical review of this subject area. that's a long time for a book to keep that sort of position. well, with apologies to mr. as sprey, i think his book is being replaced now, and max has done that with this book which is on sale outside, "invisible armies," he, i think, has set the new benchmark for this subject area. his book is very, very comprehensive, but -- and it's somewhat chronological but not entirely. and it's somewhat regional, but not entirely, and it's somewhat not functional is the right word but topical, but not i
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 5:00pm EST
honorable way to begin. it's so i got my start. he gets his first john upton at the daily "herald", an afternoon newspaper down and bollocks to gulfport purely serendipitously where i got my start. he portrays himself quite openly and but as a very gullible reporters. i certainly hope that when you bought the book and have had a chance to look at the you will be as entertaining as we were by some of his early stories of falling for ruses and having great faith that everyone was telling him the truth, as you find out later they weren't always telling the truth. of course, he then begins to develop a reputation that is very tough, hard-nosed investigative reporter which could soon be applicable * and sense and fleeing to the atlanta constitution where he continued to get be about. he did some just break through investigative reporter that we will hear about tonight. beyond that he was just terrific, shoot. he was just a great reporter. it's easy to overemphasize just that it was investigated. his career was also above standing for the first amendment he worked with a number of organizati
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 2:00pm EST
know, working with walter -- and he's the one that got me involved in all of this stuff, and john reid later on -- were both, i think, senate senate -- significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked with a lot of people, i think meeting mandela, having dealt with a number of cases, spent an hour in 1980 with fidel castro, he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt, and he said i can speak to you about that because we nationalized you in cuba, one of the first times we nationalized foreign banks, and then you offset on our reserves. so, you know, we're kind of even here. and this was in nicaragua with orr ortega who was running the sandinista government who's now back again putting this together. certainly fascinating there. i mean, i could run through so many people. i had to, one of the sessions with mandela i was asked to tell mr. mugabe who was then president of zimbabwe and is still president of zimbabwe that he'd used all his time up. and he wasn't very happy with that. and because of that, i was able to do that, our secretary of commerce, ron brown, as
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 12:30am EST
course sent an expedition under john c. fremont to explore the west they needed a guide and fremont realize that these mountain men knew the west better than anyone so he hired kit carson as a guide. carson acquitted himself himself very well on these expeditions. had he saved many people's lives and kept the expedition on track and so he became in fremont's report which became a best-selling book, carson becomes kind of the hero in the stories. but no one could seem to find this guy because he was living in mexico and was never coming back each so he was kind of this mythic character that people wanted to know a little bit more about. and so, when the "blood and thunder" looks became more popular kit carson was often the central character in the stories. these authors back east to read these terrible stories -- i would dare you to read them actually. they are not good in terms of literature but these authors never really made any attempt to understand who the real kit carson was. they didn't give his consent to use his name. kit carson did not make any money off of these books. he
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 6:00pm EST
his assassination by john wilkes booth and one of the things that makes the statute unique is that it was almost entirely paid for by freed slaves. after the president's death, a freed slave named charlotte scott approached her employer in ohio with the idea that african-americans on the statute could memorialize lincoln and washington, d.c.. to back her idea, scott donated the first $5 she had earned as a free woman to the statue fund. following space's lead, many black military veterans and organizations and african-american communities started sending money to the memorial fund until finally it had enough money to support the bronze statue with a granite base. one report suggests the african-american community provided more than $16,000 of the $17,000 price tag up the statue. once the money had been raised the managers of the memorial fund called the western sanitary commission commissioned thomas bell, an american living in italy to create something worthy of lincoln and the people that had donated their hard-earned money. he crafted a statue depicting him with of the emancipat
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 5:00pm EST
well-being of the united states with this investment consumption. >> john, when we were speaking the folder your talk, he mentioned to me the extent of the fred's involvement in the micromanagement. just give us a couple examples. it was so mind-boggling. >> people do not realize how bad dogfighting case because it is i believe a very conscious effort to take over the financial system in the united states. if you want to control an economy, control the allocation of capital. the way to do this safely is in the background. socialism does not work if everybody could see the government run businesses fail. if you can blame somebody, then it's a great way to do it. credit allocation in the united states, like the federal reserve acyclic controlling. they haven't made any big as yet, but the rolling them out. the so-called consumer compliance is credit allocation. not only can they make banks, keep banks that can make you offer products, kind of like subprime lending. you're going to see subprime consumer lending so the government can force allocation. they can also stop allocation. they
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 2:00pm EST
twitter.com/booktv. now on booktv, john allison argues that government incentives and regulation caused the 2008 claps and says that to improve the economy, we need to opt pure free-market policies. it is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. it is a pleasure to be here. i would like to congratulate heritage on the success that they have had. we did it. this is a pattern we have going forward and the purpose is to talk about my book, which is "the financial crisis and the free market cure." people ask me my i wrote the book. the basic answer is i thought it would be interesting to have somebody who knew what he was talking about write about thinking. because if you look to the academics to some degree, they don't know what they are talking about. [laughter] i think it's very important to undo a myth. these myths become destructive. the method they created is that it was caused by the deregulation on wall street. welcome to the simple fact is that this was not deregulated. we have the privacy act and we were mis-regulated, not deregulated. i have been working with wall street for 40 yea
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 2:00pm EST
have to do that. how do you do that? first, you interviewed the people who are still alive. john connolly himself was very helpful to me. he had a great ranch in south texas with a stable of quarter horses, used to come to the guest house where i would stay very early in the morning, 5:30 or 6:00 and we would go and sit on the top railing of the fence watching the mexicans exercise the quarter horses and he would tell me about -- he answered almost every question that i asked about anything in johnson's career but took me through the assassination in great detail. among the things he said was everybody thought when they heard the shots that with the motorcycle backfire or that it was a balloon going off for a firecracker but he said i was a hunter. i knew the instant i heard that it was the crack of a hunting rifle. i talked to everyone who was with lyndon johnson in the hospital, still alive, who was in hospital with lyndon johnson, congressman jack brooks, lyndon johnson's secretary, kennedy, secretary, i have learned there always seems to the other sources that have been overl
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 8:00am EST
story in some respects because it's thanks to bp and john brown, the longtime sew -- ceo of bp, that i actually got into this business. and so at the beginning of the 1990s i was with john brown flying into russia as he sent the first teams of bp people to look over various possibilities. and we went to places like west siberia where a new democratic government had taken over in the wake of a coup or near coup. of course, we remember the late period of bp and of john brown which was less happy, but in those days he was really the embodiment of the entrepreneur and true. and his vision was that russia was the place to be, but it happened in a way that he never imagined. it happened because through a combination of flukes and circumstances he was able to gain for bp access to one of the prime developed areas, one of what they call in the oil business brown field areas of russia. and in particular the one field that had been the prime field in soviet days called -- [speaking in native tongue] he was able to get an opportunity to gain control of that field in that area and then applied wes
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 9:00pm EST
would find out from what we got on the target about john d.o.e., we might hit that at midnight and another at 3:00 in the morning. the reason it was important to go fast is because the networks will reper themselves quickly. as soon as if we were terrorists, as soon as mark is captured, pretty soon i'm going it hear about it. and the first thing i do is move my location and change my all of those things, connections that i have, you call it cutouts because it moves to repair i.t. you have to be quicker than they can repair themselves and quicker than to develop new leaders. over time we started to see the relative age of lards go down. and the relative effectivenesses go down because of that. it became the rocky strategy of pummeling as fast as you can so it can't breathe. and over time had the decisive effect on it. which we actually did along with a number of other factors. one other thing thing is very interesting to me about that change, and increasing l tempo is the role that technology played. i mean, obviously we have seen the development of syndromes, we have seen the appli
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 11:00am EST
us. .. it is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you, john. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. there were two bills at national review and in the conservative movement. two bills. bill buckley, a brilliant shooting star who lit up the sky and william rusher, and never wavering north star by which conservatives learned to chart their political course. many have written about william f. buckley jr. that irresistible renaissance man, but no one until david frisk has given us an in-depth portrait of the other bill, william rusher. who among his other solutes for contributions played a pivotal role in the life of the national draft goldwater committee. that was critical because if there had been no draft goldwater committee there would have been no presidential candidate barry goldwater in 1964 and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater who approved reagan's famous a time for choosing television address which made reagan political star overnight and led to his running for governor of califor
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 10:00am EST
i reached out to coca-cola. they have a twitter account that is doc pemberton. it's, dr. john pemberton is the pharmacist who invented coca-cola. so now they have the twitter page for him. he speaks in old-timey language and talks about riding on horses. so i sent him a drawing that i had dope when i was a child. -- done when i was a child. when i was 8 years old, i was still into coca-cola. i sent him a picture, and he said, oh, that's great. i wonder what you can do now? so i sent him another picture of a pemberton wipe coca-cola bottle. there was actually alcohol in it. alcohol was prohibited before cocaine was in georgia at the time, so they had to take the alcohol out. that's when they added the caffeine to give you an extra kick, and the that was the west african cola nut. hence, the coca and the cola. so i sent him that picture, and he's like, oh, that's great too. i love it. don't show the polar bears, they might go after you. basically, i was trying to reel him in because, actually, i have another question about the single convention on narcotic drugs -- [laughter] an
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 7:00am EST
, franklin roosevelt, probably the worst dog in history, john kennedy, followed closely by lyndon johnson, there's ample opportunity. i may have to stretch the to e three or four. [laughter] perhaps the series will send my kids to college. so thanks for that. yes. >> during your historical research, have you discovered similar stories about the private lives of justices of the supreme court, or are they just above reproach? >> yeah, okay. the question about the private lives of justices of the supreme court and other politicians. like i said, the more things change. what you find is throughout history the drama, the plot stays the same in this great production of history, the actors change. early presidents were struggling with issues of privacy. for example, john quip si adams' wife, she was a very private woman, and they had a poor marriage. they fought a lot. and she kind of blamed her husband for some problems the children had. one of the kids may have committed suicide or may have been drunk and fallen off a boat and drowned, we're not sure. so she blamed him and was angry about that
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 8:00am EST
a professor at dartmouth college. that was when my first teaching job a few years ago. i was a john wesley young research professor in the math department. >> great contributed to math and computer science. >> a great place to start your academic career. anyway, my thesis was written in probability. i didn't statistics also. i just wanted to make a few comments before coming to my question. you spent a lot of time in the book about -- i was teaching a business stat course which a colleague of mine described cynically as follows, i asked him what's the difference between business stat and sophisticated business stat course is one in which every observation and your data set has a dollar sign in front of it. anyway, i spent time -- you can't prove simple limit theorem in a basic course. beautiful mathematics but you are just way over the heads of students. but anyway, you can get an intuitive description of what the theorem says. it was my reward after doing that, student evaluations at the end of the semester. professor, you talk too much. you explain to much. cut out the smalltalk,
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 10:00pm EST
on our web site such as jane goodall goodall, bill moyers, and supreme court justice john paul stevens. go to the web site at progressive forum houston .org. we're glad to give away free books just a year negative sure your ticket stub. supreme or rules to not allow us to discuss court cases of the past, present, or future but we will delved deep into her fascinating story. justice sotomayor will sign books and greet fans in the grand foyer. i cried when i read "my beloved world" and i also left. it is a good book. i believe it will be more than a best seller but because of a passive american success story required reading in his closing colleges i am amazed at the evils we have been getting from houston students filled with exclamation point saw. urine people connect with sonia sotomayor. in her book i was especially impressed of her and her brother as kids doing their homework with their mother who was also doing her's steading to becoming a registered nurse. two generations encouraging each other. to me, justice sotomayor success story should replace should replace the ratio
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 9:00am EST
agassi above is my favorite was john martin is. so that's where my inspiration comes from. i started doodling i don't care yours, but because they grew up on the reservation and not in mainstream, my cartoons were native looking. thus through some of my characters have big noses and some of the tribes up north, like the natives that they tend to have big noses. people think that's why trot the big noses, but it's because dahmer drew with large doses, so i followed him to do and not. but my inspiration -- and inspired by the people i grew up with, friends, family, members of my tribe. she's basically watching people and some of the things they do a surprising if you pay attention to what people do and what people say. there's a lot of humor you can find them not. this one says hey guys appear. they're talking to the quote premature delivery people and they have to go throughout the assistance of ladders to get the couch at their. they like this because they know it has these buildings where you go way up to the top. so this is one of my favorite. i started keeping my cartoons basicall
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 11:00pm EST
-time low as john mccain said you can account for the 9% popularity of congress during the debt ceiling crisis by blood relatives and paid staffers and we felt that by focusing on the converse, we could both diagnose the problem and give some prescriptions for how to overcome it. its chemical is one of those prescriptions? >> one of those prescriptions is very simple which is congressmen need exercise, leadership by mixing mind sets by putting aside the campaign mindset long enough to govern and adopting the compromising mind set. in order to do that they need relationships so they can spend more time in washington and less time raising money and people will say that's going to hurt them in the next election but we say that the politicians didn't enter politics just to stand on principle. very few people said politicians were entrusted to politics because they were the most principled people in the population they were in the public's because they want the government that takes the leadership and relationships. we have a phrase that is familiarity attend. there is no accident that ted k
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 4:00pm EST
thing because he's like speaker john boehner. [laughter] but the important thing is that his words spread throughout great britain, especially the phrase even to the end. he threw a lifeline to the british people and they never forgot it. during that time he was in england, there was a period of six weeks that he stayed with subsequent visits to the country during the war. hopkins would stay with winston churchill's country house. clementine was famous for not being prone to get along with people that she did not know. he was very discriminating. but she got along famously with hopkins. he had a good sense of humor and she was amused by his constant complaints to her about it she long underwear. so he would be in the downstairs bathroom shivering in his long overcoat that was made of wool and his scarf and hat. working on his memos and cable. and she would mother him at night. he would be kept up well over night drinking brandy. she would put a hot water bottle between the sheets, which she did. and she was entranced by hopkins touch with her often grumpy husband. the poke fun at t
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 8:00pm EST
supreme court justice john paul stevens. just go to our web site at houston.org. that is progressive forum houston.org. we are pleased to give a book to every attendee tonight. just show your ticket at the distribution table in the grand foyer. additional books are also on sale in the grand foyer by blue willow bookshop. after justice sotomayor's presentation she will join me for a q&a. i should say that supreme court rules don't allow us to discuss court cases of the past, present or future but we will delve deeply into her fascinating story. justice sotomayor will sign books and greet fans in the grand foyer. i cried when i read "my beloved world," and i also laughed. it is a good book. i believe it will be more than a bestseller. it will become a classic american success story and required reading in high schools and colleges. i am amazed at the e-mails we have been getting from houston students filled with exclamation points. young people connect with sonia sotomayor. in her book, i was especially impressed by the scene of sonia and her brother junior as kids doing th
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 3:00pm EST
? >> yes. [laughter] >> so, i understand that why clough john started a foundation and raised an enormous amount of money. the money disappeared. he is under investigation. can you give some substance to that whole story? >> why clough is in the book as well. very interesting guy interesting character by his own right. the thing is best known for in the course of the story of 2010 is that he wanted to become president of the republic of haiti and actually mounted a very promising campaign until a last minute when he was left off the ballot. depending on who you ask. at that time his financial problems both personal and the party from haiti his charity ngo were factored into that. i would say interestingly enough even though he was quite common knowledge in haiti that there was a widespread allegations of unpaid taxes in misspent money that had gone to as a group, most people that i was talking to, the haitians who lived there, didn't really care all that much. they were much more interested in his promise as somebody basically who could lift the dream of growing up outside of por
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 4:30pm EST
know, working with walter, and he is the one who got me involved in all of this. john reed later on. we are both, i think, significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked with a lot of people, i think meeting mandela, having dealt with a number of cases, spent an hour in 1980 with fidel castro. he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt. i said to mike and speak to you about that because we nationalized you in cuba. one of the first tax we did was nationalized the human bank. and then we're kind of even year. and this was in nicaragua. in fact, running the sandinista government, now back again running the corona where, he put us together. and certainly fascinating there. i mean, i could run through so many people. i have to up -- one of the sessions with mandela, i was asked to tell mr. mcgrath the who was then president of zimbabwe and still president of zimbabwe who had used dollars timeout. he was not very happy with that. because of that, i was able to do that. our secretary of commerce asked me if i would share the 50th anniversary of the united natio
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 12:00pm EST
killing of civil rights for yours. it is people like robert johns, the young high school student who got a walkout on the segregated school because of protesting against the inferior education in 1851. many people we don't even know their names anymore before rosa parks, two other teenagers did the same thing. so this resistant, virtually among young people. >> guest: when we talk about south africa, it was the students in soweto. we all remember nelson mandela, that nelson and all of a sudden he presents no. it is those students who revived, stephen biko another survived a movement in the early 70s family 60s. >> host: is james bevel, talking about children, young people leading the way to contain that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. tell that story. >> guest: again come a king was at a crucial point in birmingham. we had this image that king david direction we should march millions of people across the country. that's completely wrong. from a camera, which king didn't initiate, through birmingham, king is a leader in search of a following. that only in birmingham can he init
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 6:00pm EST
name down here, and it is john weisman. who is he? >> guest: he is the co-author of the book, and actually, he is the man responsible to a great extent for the book, because he was the one who convinced me to write my autobiography. c-span: why did he care? >> guest: well, he saw me testify in congress, and at the beginning he told me that he thought it was a great novel, and then he went back and he thought that it was a very good story to tell, and he finally got through, by a common friend that we had, to be able to convince me -- it took him about six months to convince me to write the book. i think one of the factors that contributed most to that was what i had to go through, and my family had to go through, with senator kerry's committee, and i thought it was a good idea then to write the book and set the record straight on that account. c-span: when was the first time you ever told anybody that you worked for the cia, outside of your family, in other words, publically? >> guest: well, after i retired, i retired openly, so when i retired, i could tell people that i worked fo
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 10:00pm EST
this wonderful suburb of washington which john kerry carried 80/20 or something like that. can we had pet spas and gas drove spas. we had her children and move to the excerpts which george bush carried 80/20. there is a big roadside that says watch children entire community because their kids running around everywhere. people as bill bishop noted moved into these little communities. >> host: does that have to be that way? >> guest: i don't know on that's an excellent question. we kind of wish it wasn't that way. i. i think most people wish it wasn't that way but this is part of what has happened i think with increasing mobilization in america. if you go back a generation, or two generations i suppose you would be in a town a suburban town in pennsylvania or new york state and on any given street you have people from every single age group living there. you would have the old people who have been in the neighborhood since they were born in people who are older in people in the middle childbearing years who are just starting out and people didn't just pick up and move. people basica
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 6:00pm EST
done but challenge began. you can't call up john harper collins and say here's my book i want some of that money. publishers don't select the manuscript. the literary agents are notoriously famously liberal, which is fine, but if you have your lieberman here, maybe starbucks, which is no problem but we had more than 100 agents, and you would think that it would be easy to get people to take 15% of your potential earnings. but it wasn't. one called me to tell me that he hoped my teeth fell out and another said that it was because of people like us that americans are up to our years in the blood of our children to read it was vicious. i don't mind being passed on, but i mind being scolded. eventually we found a fantastic agent and he sold a book to simon and schuster threshold in print and a couple of weeks and now a great launch party in new york we even got on to page six without having to go to rehab, and we got to do really fun stuff like this for my personal favorite guilty pleasure, c-span's book tv. i would like to invite him to come up and speak as well if any small victories ha
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